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Mule Deer - J Zumbo


It's said that Lewis and dark gave the mule deer Its name because it reminded them of a deer with large mule-like ears. This is strictly a western animal that lives in every western state and in western Canada. Commonly called the "muley," this deer inhabits more open country than elk, preferring to be in brush and drier country, Nonetheless, muleys are amazingly adaptable and live in habitats from lowland deserts to alpine tundra above timberline.

Mule deer populations are often ravaged by severe winters when deep snows blanket their forage and extreme cold saps their energy. These massive declines are cyclic, and herds bounce back during years of mild winters. Muleys are migratory, often traveling long distances from high summer ranges to lowland winter areas where snow is not as deep and food Is more available.

wildlife



"The Wildlife of Yellowstone"
- 94 Minutes -

The Wildlife of Yellowstone DVD presents to you the most popular and prominent wildlife inhabiting Yellowstone National Park. This dvd, taped in digital format, has the highest quality scenes of grizzlies, black bears, moose, wolves, otters, owls, fox and much more including their young. Inside this dvd you will find

· 94 Minutes on the Wildlife of Yellowstone.
· Three Chapters : Large Mammals, Small Mammals and Birds
· Narrated by Yellowstone Tour Owner and Specialist - Ken Sinay
· Where, When and How to Spot the Wildlife of Yellowstone

More Info or Order Online

 

You can expect to see mule deer anywhere around Yellowstone, but especially in sagebrush areas. In the summer you'll see them high in the mountains, often in fields of wildflowers or along rocky, brushy slopes. Along rural roads you'll often spot them feeding in fields, especially in alfalfa, one of their favorite summer foods. In the

late spring and summer, look for animals with rust-colored fur. In the early morning and late afternoon, they appear to be almost orange. In the fall, this summer coat is shed and deer then take on a gray winter pelt. In sunshine, their distinctive white rumps are often the first thing you'll see.

Unlike male whitetails, the antlers of mature mule deer bucks typically have double forks that are often high and wide. Young bucks may have single, spike-like antlers or small single-forked antlers. Here's where you can see mule deer. In Yellowstone, most deer are seen in the drier habitat from Gardiner and Mammoth out toward the Lamar Valley. The best time to view deer here Is in late fall when they migrate to lower elevations to seek does and find more food. Muleys live in scattered locations in the park, and you're apt to see them anywhere in the summer. Outside the park, look for them in the Driggs-Victor area in Idaho, as well as in the sagebrush country west of Freedom, Wyoming. A prime spot to see them is along the Chief Joseph Highway, especially in the area along the dark Fork River. Another superb region is around Roscoe, Montana, and along the rural roads and farm fields there.

 

Whitetail Deer


Many people believe whitetails are an "eastern" species, but they thrive in the west. These are the most common deer in America, so named because of their huge tails that are brown on top and white below. When a whitetall is running from danger, it "flags" its tail, waving it about and signaling other animals.

A buck's antlers typically have a pair of curved main beams with several tines growing off each. In the fall, bucks fight viciously in a battle of dominance to win does. Like mule deer, whitetails breed from mid-November to mid-December.

Unlike mule deer, whitetails are much more at home around people. Some live all their lives on a relatively small chunk of landscape no bigger than 30 or 40 acres. Whitetails are fond of farmlands and are mostly seen in agricultural areas.

There are occasional reports of whitetails in Yellowstone, but they're very rare. You can see plenty along the Yellowstone River along 1-90. Look for them in agricultural areas around Powell and Lovell east of Cody, Wyoming. There are also good numbers of them around dark, Wyoming.

 

 


For more information on Yellowstone National Park and
the surrounding communities visit these helpful sites:

YellowstoneNationalPark.com
- YellowstoneLodging.com
YellowstoneFlyFishing.com


Copyright @1999-2013 Yellowstone Media

 

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